Saturday, September 26, 2020

Retro Review: TI-36 Solar

Retro Review:  TI-36 Solar 


Just the Facts:


Model:  TI-36 Solar

Company: Texas Instruments

Type: Scientific

Display:  10 digit with 2-digit exponents

Battery:  Solar

Logic: AOS

Memory Registers: 1

Years: 1984-1990


Features:


*  Complex Number Arithmetic

*  Rounding Numbers (to fixed number setting)

*  Base Conversions

*  Normal Distribution

*  Single-Variable Statistics


Examples with Complex Numbers


MODE 5:  CPLX


There are two separate registers to hold parts of complex numbers:


[ a ]:  Real part (rectangular),  Radius (polar)

[ b ]:  Imaginary part (rectangular), Angle (polar)


Example 1:  (4 + 3i) * (11 - 2i)


4 [ a ] 3 [ b ] [ × ] 11 [ a ] 2 [ +/- ] [ b ] [ = ]


Display:  50  

Press [ b ], Display:  25


Result:  50 + 25i


Example 2:  Convert 3 + 2.4i to polar form, degrees


3 [ a ] 2.4 [ b ] [ INV ] (R>P) 


Display:  3.841874542

Press [ b ],  Display:  38.65980826


3 + 2.4i = 3.841874542 ∠ 38.65980826°


Examples with Normal Distribution


MODE 6:  STAT


There are three functions that determine the area under the normal distribution curve:


P(t) from - ∞ to t,  lower tail curve

R(t) from 0 to t

Q(t) from t to ∞, upper tail curve


Note that for any t, P(t) + Q(t) = 1.


Also note that P(t), R(t), and Q(t) will operate on the standard normal curve, where μ = 0 and σ = 1, regardless of the amount of data points entered in Statistics mode through Σ+.


For z = t =2:


2 [ INV ] ( P(t) ) returns 0.97725

2 [ INV ] ( R(t) ) returns 0.47725

2 [ INV ] ( Q(t) ) returns 0.02275


Comparison:  TI-36 Solar vs. TI-35 Plus



The TI-36 Solar and TI-35 Plus have the same set of functions and features.  You can see my retro review from 2017 of the TI-35 Plus here:  http://edspi31415.blogspot.com/2017/09/retro-review-texas-instruments-ti-35.html


There are several keyboard differences:

Shift key is marked [ INV ] (with 2nd above it) for the TI-36 Solar, and the shift key is marked [ 2nd ] for the TI-35 Plus.

The equals key is twice in vertical height, covering the spans of the bottom two rows on the TI-35 Plus.

The top three rows* (all of the shift markings remain intact):


TI-36 Solar:

[CE/C] [ 1/x ] [ a ] [ b ] [ AC ]

[ hyp ] [ sin ] [ cos ] [ tan ] [ DRG ]

[ INV ] [ x^2 ] [ log ] [ ln x ] [ y^x ]


TI-35 Plus:

[ 2nd ] [ x^2 ] [ log ] [ ln x ] [ OFF ]

[ hyp ] [ sin ] [ cos ] [ tan ] [ DRG ]

[ y^x ] [ 1/x ] [ a ] [ b ] [ ÷ ]


The [ hyp ] key has the hyp^-1 label over it on the TI-35 Plus.  


*not counting the [ON/C] key above all the rows on the TI-35 Plus


Comparison:  TI-36 Solar vs. the original TI-36X Solar 



Here is my review from 2018 for the TI-36X Solar:  http://edspi31415.blogspot.com/2018/09/retro-review-texas-instruments-ti-36x.html

The TI-36X Solar:  

*  does not have the complex arithmetic mode of the TI-36 Solar

*  adds the Boolean functions AND, OR, XOR, XNOR, and NOT to the BIN, OCT, and HEX mode

*  adds linear regression

*  adds a second shift key, [ 3rd ]

*  there is no [ MODE ] key, every mode is selected through [ 3rd ] (key) combos

*  adds a fraction/decimal conversions

*  adds 8 scientific constants and 10 metric/US conversions


Verdict

Like the TI-35 Plus, the TI-36 Solar is a step up from the TI-30 series (1980s versions of TI-30).   Again, the TI-34 (1987) has the Boolean functions and fraction functions that the TI-36 Solar doesn't.  You don't have to worry about batteries at all since the TI-36 Solar runs entirely on solar/light power.


Eddie


All original content copyright, © 2011-2020.  Edward Shore.   Unauthorized use and/or unauthorized distribution for commercial purposes without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited.  This blog entry may be distributed for noncommercial purposes, provided that full credit is given to the author. 


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