Saturday, August 16, 2014

Pythonista 2.7: List of Primes, Rotating a List, Maximum of a List, Vandermonde Matrix

List of Primes

# list of primes to n
# 8/13/2014
import math
n=input('maximum n (n>2):')
# start the list of primes
l=[2]
# test all integers from 3 to n
for k in range(3,n+1):
# set flag
x=0
for j in range(2,k-1):
# test for composite menu
if math.fmod(k,j)==0:
x=1
if x==0:
# add to list that k is prime
l.append(k)
# return list of primes
print l


Example: n = 44 returns

[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 41, 43]


I am getting used to the way the range command operates and how the indices go from 0 to n-1, instead of how programming calculators have it: 0 to n.

Rotate a List to the Right

# rotate a list to the right r places
import math
l=input('list: ')
r=input('number of places: ')
n=len(l)
# rotation loop
for k in range(r):
# remember range starts at 0
# remove last element
w=l.pop()
# insert that element at position 0
l.insert(0,w)
# print rotated list
print l


Example:

List: [0, 4, -6, 8]

Number of Places: 2; return [-6, 8, 0, 4]
Number of Places: 3; return [4, -6, 8, 0]

Maximum of a List

import math
l=input('list: ')
# sort the list - without a loop
l.sort()
print l.pop()


Example: [12, 16, 28, 3, 4] returns 28

Vamdermonde Matrix

# building the Vandermonde matrix a row at a time
import math
v=input('vector: ')
n=len(v)

print('Vandermonde Matrix')

# main routine
# power
for i in range(n):
l=[]
# element build
for k in range(n):
l.append(math.pow(v[k],i))
print l


Example:
[0.8, 0.6, -0.5] returns

[1, 0.8, 0.64]
[1, 0.6, 0.36]
[1, -0.5, 0.25]


Enjoy!

Have a great weekend!


Eddie



This blog is property of Edward Shore. 2014

No comments:

Post a Comment

Retro Review: Texas Instruments TI-68

Retro Review:  Texas Instruments TI-68 Company:  Texas Instruments Years:  1989 - 2002 Type:  Scientific, Formula Programmin...