Monday, August 8, 2022

Texas Instruments: TI-36X Pro and TI-30X Pro Mathprint

 Essentially, the Texas Instruments TI-36X Pro and the TI-30X MathPrint are functionally equivalent.  What makes the two calculators different?


*  The TI-36X Pro is sold in the United States and in lot of the world, with the TI-30X MathPrint is sold primarily from Europe.  I ordered my TI-30X Pro MathPrint from the United Kingdom.  


Product pages from Texas Instruments:


TI-36X Pro (United States and Canada)

https://education.ti.com/en/products/calculators/scientific-calculators/ti-36x-pro


TI-30X MathPrint (Denmark, in Danish):

https://education.ti.com/da/products/calculators/scientific-calculators/ti-30x-pro-mp#specifications


Australia has a TI-30XPlus MathPrint, which is styled like the TI-30X Pro MathPrint, but without calculus functions.

https://education.ti.com/en-au/products/calculators/scientific-calculators/ti-30x-plus-mp?category=overview


*  Thanks to the body of the calculator being curved, the TI-36X Pro is slightly bigger than the TI-30X Pro MathPrint. 


*  The screen on the TI-36X Pro is a curved trapezoid, while the screen of the TI-30X Pro MathPrint has is rectangular.  


*  The TI-36X Pro has a circular arrow keypad while the TI-30X Pro MathPrint has a rectangular arrow keypad.  


* The TI-30X Pro Math print has black characters, while the TI-36X Pro has blue characters.


* The font on the keys of the TI-30X Pro Math are larger than than the font on the TI-36X Pro's keys.


Here are some pictures.













Either calculator is worth buying.  You  can see my review of the TI-36X Pro from 2011 here:

P.S. I still wish the TI-36X Pro/TI-30X Pro MathPrint had an alpha key instead of one key to press multiple times to get different variables.  That is my biggest gripe. 

Eddie



All original content copyright, © 2011-2022.  Edward Shore.   Unauthorized use and/or unauthorized distribution for commercial purposes without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited.  This blog entry may be distributed for noncommercial purposes, provided that full credit is given to the author. 






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